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The Keystone Marker Trust depends on citizens like yourself to step up and play an active role in this vital but often overlooked part of Pennsylvania's history and culture.  If you've adopted a marker, maintained a marker, found a marker not listed in our database, or just have stories or photos about your town's marker, click here to share them with us on this website!

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Jared Kofsky10/31/2013
This photo shows http//www.keystonemarkertrust.org/default.aspx?pg116locID147 marker in Easton PA. http//www.flickr.com/photos/jaredkofsky/10597171846/
Mike Wintermantel10/01/2012
I found this marker photo at my family reunion this past weekend, a couple members of my family are standing in front of it. The ruins of the dam are located in Austin PA, it reads Austin Dam - Destroyed by Flood - Sept 30, 1911...the rest is unreadable. Just shows you some of the now gone markers that used to dot the countryside around Pennsylvania.
Cheri Campbell08/15/2012
I took the Looker Mountain Trail sign photo in about 2003. The road, which is known officially as SR 246, is named for my mother's maternal great-grandfather John C. Looker 1855-1938. John Looker was a prominent oilman philanthropist. He paid for the initial paving of the road. His house is at the top of the mountain, just off a side road. His daughter my great-grandmother supposedly badgered the state to put up the sign. Repainted by township road crew in 2003.
Bruce Clark01/27/2012
I started collecting photos of Pennsylvania historical markers and keystone markers 20 years ago! I wasn't sure which direction my new business Roadside Magnets would take - recreating state markers in miniature. Now, my Historical Marker Magnets and Keystone Marker Magnets have proven to be excellent fundraising items! Here is a photo of the Kulpsville sign - which is no longer there. I do know exactly where it used to be!
Jim Carn08/14/2011
Claarkstown KM I stopped at Sones Farm Home Museum on July 29th. Marker was hit by a truck that ran off the roadway years ago in Clarkstown. It broke the sign in three pieces and only the largest piece was found. PennDOT was going to scrap the sign so Oliver Sones bought it for 1. After he obtained the sign the owner of the adjoining farm where the sign had been located asked Sones him if he wanted the missing piece as he had found it in his wheat field and nearly struck it with a combine. Sones plans to move the marker from his museum back to a churchyard in Clarkstown.
Jack Graham05/27/2010
Some Recent Marker Repair Updates Part II DUNCANNON - Only one marker remains. It was found after much searching hidden away in the basement of the Borough hall. It had a corner broken off. Its sign has now been repaired/repainted and put back on the pole which was empty for several years. LOYSVILLE Two markers here were badly in need of painting one had a corner broken off. A local body shop repaired/repainted the signs as a community service. LANDISBURG - Only one marker remains. Its sign had been broken before and partially welded back together, and is in need of repainting. A local body shop has it and promises to re-weld and repaint the sign soon. MIFFLINTOWN - Only one marker remains. County commissioner and Borough have indicated they intend to get the sign repainted soon, perhaps as a student project at Mifflin/Juniata Vo-Tech School.
Nathaniel Guest05/27/2010
Nathaniel C. Guest 05/27/2010 Sanatoga, Pennsylvania, has two markers. A few years ago George Wausnock and the local historical society undertook a program to restore them. The effort required the repair of a large crack on the western sign and the fabrication of a replacement sign for the eastern marker. The western marker prior to both the crack and the restoration, as well as the replacement eastern marker, are show here.
Jim Carn05/27/2010
This is the eastbound and westbound sides of a two-sided Keystone Marker on PA RT 442 between Clarkstown and Opp. I completed it last Friday. Jim
Jim Carn05/26/2010
Attached are photos of the Glade Run KM on Water Street in Muncy, completed last Friday, May 21. This sign was busted in two years ago and bolted back together using metal supports on the back side. You can barely read the old lettering GLADE RUN on the first photo where the new coat of paint is beginning to be applied.
Jim Carn05/24/2010
I live near the Pine Creek Valley in central PA, and hike, bike, and volunteer hundreds of hours every year to the forestry department. I also am a life member and attend Pine Creek Preservation Association meetings in the valley at Waterville. Over the years while driving up and down the valley on Rt 44, I noticed the Ramsey Run, Waterville and Little Pine Creek keystone markers were in bad shape. I contacted PennDOT spokesman Rick Mason at his Montoursville office and requested permission to repaint the signs. If you ask 'Why did you do this?' I would reply, 'Because the signs were there and nobody else was doing anything to improve their appearance.' The signs took about 6 trips to the valley to complete and the small expense out of pocket was more than worth it with all the people that drove by honking their vehicle's horn, giving me a thumbs up, shouting 'Look's nice!, Great Job!' and other positive comments.

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